2022 HEALTHCARE HIRING OUTLOOK

Hiring + retaining top healthcare talent in a new normal

2022 HEALTHCARE
HIRING OUTLOOK

Hiring + retaining top healthcare talent in a new normal

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the healthcare industry was facing some serious workforce challenges. An aging population (and workforce), major staffing shortages, mounting financial concerns, and the demand for highly specialized skill sets represent just a few. The pandemic only exacerbated these issues, while creating new recruitment and talent management challenges.

 

To help you navigate these shifts amid the backdrop of the pandemic, we surveyed both hiring decision makers in the healthcare industry along with hundreds of clinical and operational healthcare staff to find out what the hiring climate will look like in 2022.

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the healthcare industry was facing some serious workforce challenges. An aging population (and workforce), major staffing shortages, mounting financial concerns, and the demand for highly specialized skill sets represent just a few. The pandemic only exacerbated these issues, while creating new recruitment and talent management challenges.

 

To help you navigate these shifts amid the backdrop of the pandemic, we surveyed both hiring decision makers in the healthcare industry along with hundreds of clinical and operational healthcare staff to find out what the hiring climate will look like in 2022.

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the healthcare industry was facing some serious workforce challenges. An aging population (and workforce), major staffing shortages, mounting financial concerns, and the demand for highly specialized skill sets represent just a few. The pandemic only exacerbated these issues, while creating new recruitment and talent management challenges.

 

To help you navigate these shifts amid the backdrop of the pandemic, we surveyed both hiring decision makers in the healthcare industry along with hundreds of clinical and operational healthcare staff to find out what the hiring climate will look like in 2022.

The greatest challenges organizations have faced as the pandemic has evolved:
The greatest challenges organizations
have faced as the pandemic has evolved:
70% cannot keep up with meeting staffing needs
62% are facing challenges managing staff burnout
51% struggle to adapt operations to meet changing demands
70% cannot keep up with meeting staffing needs
62% are facing challenges managing staff burnout
51% struggle to adapt operations to meet changing demands
70% cannot keep up with meeting staffing needs
62% are facing challenges managing staff burnout
51% struggle to adapt operations to meet changing demands

What does the future workplace look like for clinical, administrative, and operational staff, and how can you keep them engaged in a work environment that has forever been changed? Here's what we learned:

Addressing talent turnover when healthcare professionals are leaving the profession:

  • 73% of employers have experienced more voluntary turnover in 2021 than in previous years

  • 41% of healthcare organizations said finding clinical staff was their top hiring challenge of 2021

  • About 1 in 5 healthcare workers have left medicine since the pandemic began

Pandemic burnout is taking a toll on staff:

  • 94% of employers reported that stress and uncertainty around COVID-19 has impacted their employees’ mental health
  • 45% of healthcare professionals have said they feel overwhelmed due to increased responsibilities and more demanding patient loads
Evolving Employee Expectations + Job Search Trends
 Evolving Employee Expectations + Job Search Trends

As a result of the pandemic, employee expectations have shifted drastically—and healthcare professionals are in search of new opportunities that can better meet their needs. With plenty of job openings available, employers who can’t meet these expectations risk missing out on (and losing) great talent.

Talent is on the move: 62% of healthcare professionals are actively job searching
Hiring is up: 72% of organizations are planning on increasing staff headcount in 2022

As a result of the pandemic, employee expectations have shifted drastically—and healthcare professionals are in search of new opportunities that can better meet their needs. With plenty of job openings available, employers who can’t meet these expectations risk missing out on (and losing) great talent.

Talent is on the move: 62% of healthcare professionals are actively job searching
Hiring is up: 72% of organizations are planning on increasing staff headcount in 2022
What job seekers are looking for today

Here's what job seekers ranked as their top considerations in a new job:

competitive
compensation

68%

said that their primary concern is receiving competitive compensation

flexible
scheduling

46%

are looking for an employer who can give them a more flexible schedule

work
environment

44%

want a work environment where they are treated with respect and humanity

employee health
and safety

42%

want a workplace where their health and safety is taken seriously

Top job search trends:

Hybrid work

The demand for hybrid work is rising.

1 in 3

1 in 3 healthcare professionals have stated that hybrid (a combination of in-person and remote work) is their ideal work environment.

Virtual interviews

Virtual interview processes are here to stay.

43%

43% of professionals prefer a remote interview process.

37%

37% of employers are currently utilizing a hybrid interview process (combination of remote and in-person) for clinical and non-clinical roles.

Skills growth

Healthcare professionals are learning new skills, which may drive the desire for continued professional development.

83%

83% of healthcare professionals have said they have gained new skills during the pandemic.

Healthcare settings

The settings where professionals are looking for work:

1.

Outpatient (58%)

2.

Hospital (49%)

3.

Telehealth (40%)

4.

Long-term care (20%)

5.

Managed care (19%)

6.

Home care (17%)

Types of roles

Healthcare professionals are open to a diverse range of roles:

1.

Contract (64%)

2.

Full-time (63%)

3.

Per diem (55%)

4.

Travel (47%)

DE&I

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DE&I) is central to talent attraction.

25%

25% of healthcare professionals consider an organization's DE&I efforts closely when choosing a company to join.

Hybrid work

The demand for hybrid work is rising.

1 in 3

1 in 3 healthcare professionals have stated that hybrid (a combination of in-person and remote work) is their ideal work environment.

Virtual interviews

Virtual interview processes are here to stay.

43%

43% of professionals prefer a remote interview process.

37%

37% of employers are currently utilizing a hybrid interview process (combination of remote and in-person) for clinical and non-clinical roles.

Skills growth

Healthcare professionals are learning new skills, which may drive the desire for continued professional development.

83%

83% of healthcare professionals have said they have gained new skills during the pandemic.

Healthcare settings

The settings where professionals are looking for work:

1.

Outpatient (58%)

2.

Hospital (49%)

3.

Telehealth (40%)

4.

Long-term care (20%)

5.

Managed care (19%)

6.

Home care (17%)

Types of roles

Healthcare professionals are open to a diverse range of roles:

1.

Contract (64%)

2.

Full-time (63%)

3.

Per diem (55%)

4.

Travel (47%)

DE&I

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DE&I) is central to talent attraction.

25%

25% of healthcare professionals consider an organization's DE&I efforts closely when choosing a company to join.
 Employee Burnout: The Great Equalizer
Employee Burnout: The Great Equalizer

The pandemic has intensified burnout amongst healthcare professionals—challenging the resiliency of all healthcare organizations. As practitioners and non-clinical staff are pushed closer to the brink, the entire industry must brace for a wave of high turnover. Or, act quickly.

 

Increased levels of stress and burnout can have consequences beyond turnover—they can result in poor patient outcomes and impact an employee’s ability to provide safe care. As the pandemic continues to evolve, healthcare professionals are having a more difficult time managing their mental health.

Burnout is driving the Great Resignation in healthcare

  • Healthcare organizations cite employee burnout as their #1 challenge to employee retention

  • 37% of clinicians are considering leaving the workforce, while 47% of them are considering a new career path as a result of the pandemic

  • Over one third (35%) of clinicians have considered switching to a non-clinical role as a result of the pandemic

Mental health throughout the pandemic:
negative
impact

1 in 3

professionals have said their mental health has been negatively impacted

unplugging

38%

of healthcare professionals say they are not able to unplug from work

employee
morale

75%

of employers stated that employee morale has been low

work-life
boundaries

78%

of employers said that employees struggle to maintain work-life boundaries

Despite these trends, employers aren't offering the support staff needs:
  • 68% of professionals report that their organization does not offer any mental wellness initiatives

  • Only 39% of healthcare organizations have expanded mental health benefits + support programs as the pandemic has evolved

 Tips for Attracting + Retaining Top Talent
Tips for Attracting + Retaining Top Talent

The pandemic has required healthcare organizations and professionals alike to adapt and be flexible. While there may be a push to refocus on core operations or re-instate pre-pandemic processes, there’s no going back—only forward. As we transition to a “new normal,” organizations should reflect on what worked and how employees have been impacted, and remain open to change.

 

This is especially true when it comes to your strategies for attracting and retaining talent. Hiring and maintaining the appropriate staffing levels can help with continuity of care, employee morale, and the bottom line. Ensure you are set up for success by considering these tips for hiring and talent engagement.

77% of hiring managers say it takes longer than 90 days, on average, to fill clinical roles
66% of hiring managers say it takes longer than 90 days, on average, to fill non-clinical roles

The pandemic has required healthcare organizations and professionals alike to adapt and be flexible. While there may be a push to refocus on core operations or re-instate pre-pandemic processes, there’s no going back—only forward. As we transition to a “new normal,” organizations should reflect on what worked and how employees have been impacted, and remain open to change.

 

This is especially true when it comes to your strategies for attracting and retaining talent. Hiring and maintaining the appropriate staffing levels can help with continuity of care, employee morale, and the bottom line. Ensure you are set up for success by considering these tips for hiring and talent engagement.

77% of hiring managers say it takes longer than 90 days, on average, to fill clinical roles
66% of hiring managers say it takes longer than 90 days, on average, to fill non-clinical roles
Why employees are leaving:

Lack of work-life balance

Higher compensation elsewhere

Lack of flexible work options

Burnout from being overworked

Lack of work-life balance

Higher compensation elsewhere

Lack of flexible work options

Burnout from being overworked

1 in 3 employees are not satisfied with their compensation

1 in 3 employees are not satisfied with their compensation

1 in 3 employees are not satisfied with their compensation

Attraction + retention strategies for employers:

Offer higher wages

One third of healthcare professionals feel underpaid, according to our research. Show these highly essential employees that you value them by paying them what they’re worth. The same concept applies to job offers. You should always lead with your best and most competitive offer to attract top talent.

Speed up your hiring process

The best clinicians and non-clinical staff are in high demand and short supply, so you must act quickly once you begin the hiring process. If you take too long to respond to applicants, schedule interviews, or make a final decision, you’ll likely miss out on a top applicant. Worse, it can lead the position to remain unfilled—forcing other staff members to pick up the slack. This added burden can lead to higher levels of burnout and stress.

Be more flexible with job requirements

As clinical shortages reach critical levels, you must be more flexible when assessing candidates. While there’s some criteria that may be critical, keep an open mind about candidates with the right foundational skills and personality traits for the role. Hiring for potential and nurturing less experienced talent can also have a positive effect on retention.

Utilize a staffing partner

Whether you have a hard-to-fill opening, a highly specialized need, or a large volume project, collaborating with a healthcare staffing partner can be a strategic move. With access to a pipeline of qualified candidates, unique market insight, and other hiring resources, they can efficiently connect you with the right talent and help guide you on best practices for talent attraction and retention.

Embrace technology

There has been no better time to adapt to new technological advances in the workplace. Improving technology is not only critical to a healthcare organization’s ability to provide care, but to also improve the entire employee experience. Consider investing in the right smart technology to better support flexible work and interviewing opportunities, improve communication channels, and enable cross-organizational partnerships.

Offer more flexibility

There is a widening gap between what healthcare facilities need from staff and what healthcare professionals are looking for in an employer. Many organizations are understaffed and are looking for providers with a high level of engagement, while professionals are feeling burnt out and stretched too thin. There is no one-size-fits all solution, but there are steps employers can take to help support work-life balance and mitigate burnout for all employees:
Let staff have greater control over their schedules
Recognize that flexiblity looks different for different people
Allow employees to work remotely, if and when possible

Expand support for mental health

It’s clear that the country is facing a crisis of burned out healthcare workers, and hospitals and health systems are still playing catch up. Even prior to the pandemic, this was a concern—but with each wave, employees are feeling more exhausted and less supported. If facilities want to turn this around, they need to focus on creating a culture that values employee wellbeing. Leaders should check in with staff, act on feedback, and expand access to mental health resources.

Ready to transform your hiring process? Get in touch.

Ready to transform your hiring process?

Get in touch.