skills-shortage

ADDRESSING THE

SKILLS SHORTAGE

job-security

REDEFINING

JOB SECURITY

collaboration

COLLABORATION

& CULTURE

wellness

WELLNESS IN

THE WORKPLACE

skills-shortage

ADDRESSING THE

SKILLS SHORTAGE

job-security

REDEFINING

JOB SECURITY

collaboration

COLLABORATION

& CULTURE

wellness

WELLNESS IN

THE WORKPLACE

skills-shortage

ADDRESSING THE

SKILLS SHORTAGE

job-security

REDEFINING

JOB SECURITY

collaboration

COLLABORATION

& CULTURE

wellness

WELLNESS IN

THE WORKPLACE

2018 HIRING OUTLOOK

The Impact Of The Growing Skills Shortage On The Employer-Employee Relationship

2018 HIRING OUTLOOK

The Impact Of The Growing Skills Shortage

On The Employer-Employee Relationship

2018 HIRING OUTLOOK

The Impact Of The Growing Skills Shortage

On The Employer-Employee Relationship

2018 HIRING OUTLOOK

The Impact Of The Growing Skills Shortage

On The Employer-Employee Relationship

INTRO

Let's face it. The job market looks a lot different than it did just a few short years ago.

 

After 86 consecutive months of job gains, the national unemployment rate in November of 2017 was 4.1%—the lowest it has been in 17 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While this certainly points to a positive trend, it does create new challenges for employers. In this market, where professionals know they can be more selective when making career decisions, talent engagement at all stages of the employment life cycle—from hiring and onboarding to succession planning—will become even more critical for success in 2018. 

4.1%

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Not only is the competition for talent stronger than ever before, but employers are now facing a new set of challenges. Whether it’s addressing the skills shortage, transitioning into a millennial-dominated workforce, or keeping up with evolving industry trends, these factors traverse all sectors. They also all contribute to one overarching theme: the evolving employer-employee relationship.

 

Today, professionals consider their careers an integral part of their lives. While they still care about compensation and traditional benefits, they expect their job to provide personal fulfillment and meaning. If they do not enjoy what they are doing, cannot see their impact, are not learning new skills, or do not feel valued by their employer, they will move on.

 
extend-counter-offer

EMPLOYERS

65% of employers said that they would extend a counter offer in order to keep their best

employees.

empployer-employee

EMPLOYEES

However, 60% of employees said that they would reject a counter offer from their current employer.

(an increase from 55% in 2017)

reject-counter-offer

Case in point: there has been a reduction in the number of employees who are willing to accept a counter offer. What professionals are looking for in an employer (and their careers) is changing, so making a last-ditch effort to entice them to stay with higher compensation will not work. The investment needs to be made before they have one foot out the door, and you have to show you care about their future.

 

 

JOB VS. CAREER:

Employee Mentality Over The Years

expand

OLD MODEL:

Work for the company

work-for-the-company
contract
pay-benefits
Employees were in search of pay, benefits, and stability in exchange for loyalty to the employer.
expand

NEW MODEL:

Work for career development

career-development
contract
professional-marketability
Employees today are in search of purpose, personalization, and development to improve professional marketability.

65%

of working professionals plan to stay with their employer for

5 YEARS

OR LESS

To build strong employee engagement, employers must first accept this

new relationship with their staff. Next, they must turn inward and determine

how they can create a culture that recognizes and nurtures talent, while

helping them achieve purpose and fulfillment in their lives.

To help guide employers on navigating the new employer-employee relationship, this eBook offers a unique perspective into: 

 

 
growing-skills-shortage

How to address the skills shortage

through strategic hiring

train-staff

How redefining job security has changed the way employers train staff and engage with talent

collaboration-transparency

The importance of creating a culture of collaboration and transparency

employee-health

How to embrace wellness in the workplace

and invest in the health of employees

Let's face it. The job market looks a lot different than it did just a few short years ago.

 

After 86 consecutive months of job gains, the national unemployment rate in November of 2017 was 4.1%—the lowest it has been in 17 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While this certainly points to a positive trend, it does create new challenges for employers. In this market, where professionals know they can be more selective when making career decisions, talent engagement at all stages of the employment life cycle—from hiring and onboarding to succession planning—will become even more critical for success in 2018. 

4.1%

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Not only is the competition for talent stronger than ever before, but employers are now facing a new set of challenges. Whether it’s addressing the skills shortage, transitioning into a millennial-dominated workforce, or keeping up with evolving industry trends, these factors traverse all sectors. They also all contribute to one overarching theme: the evolving employer-employee relationship.

 

Today, professionals consider their careers an integral part of their lives. While they still care about compensation and traditional benefits, they expect their job to provide personal fulfillment and meaning. If they do not enjoy what they are doing, cannot see their impact, are not learning new skills, or do not feel valued by their employer, they will move on.

 
extend-counter-offer

EMPLOYERS

65% of employers said that they would

extend a counter offer in order to keep

their best employees.

EMPLOYEES

However, 60% of employees said that they would reject a counter offer from their current employer.

(an increase from 55% in 2017)

reject-counter-offer

Case in point: there has been a reduction in the number of employees who are willing to accept a counter offer. What professionals are looking for in an employer (and their careers) is changing, so making a last-ditch effort to entice them to stay with higher compensation will not work. The investment needs to be made before they have one foot out the door, and you have to show you care about their future.

 

 

JOB VS. CAREER:

Employee Mentality Over The Years

expand

OLD MODEL:

Work for the company

work-for-company
contract
pay-benefits
Employees were in search of pay,
benefits, and stability in exchange
for loyalty to the employer.
expand

NEW MODEL:

Work for career development

career-development
contract
professional-marketability
Employees today are in search of purpose,
personalization, and development to
improve professional marketability.

65%

of working professionals plan to stay with their employer for

5 YEARS

OR LESS

To build strong employee engagement, employers must first

accept this new relationship with their staff. Next, they must

turn inward and determine how they can create a culture that

recognizes and nurtures talent, while helping them achieve

purpose and fulfillment in their lives.

To help guide employers on navigating the new employer-employee relationship, this eBook offers a unique perspective into: 

 

 
growing-skills-shortage

How to address

the skills shortage

through strategic hiring

train-staff

How redefining job security has changed the way employers train

staff and engage with talent

collaboration-transparency

The importance of creating

a culture of collaboration

and transparency

employee-health

How to embrace wellness in

the workplace and invest in

the health of employees

INTRO

Let's face it. The job market looks a lot different than it did just a few short years ago.

 

After 86 consecutive months of job gains, the national unemployment rate in November of 2017 was 4.1%—the lowest it has been in 17 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While this certainly points to a positive trend, it does create new challenges for employers. In this market, where professionals know they can be more selective when making career decisions, talent engagement at all stages of the employment life cycle—from hiring and onboarding to succession planning—will become even more critical for success in 2018. 

4.1%

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Not only is the competition for talent stronger than ever before, but employers are now facing a new set of challenges. Whether it’s addressing the skills shortage, transitioning into a millennial-dominated workforce, or keeping up with evolving industry trends, these factors traverse all sectors. They also all contribute to one overarching theme: the evolving employer-employee relationship.

 

Today, professionals consider their careers an integral part of their lives. While they still care about compensation and traditional benefits, they expect their job to provide personal fulfillment and meaning. If they do not enjoy what they are doing, cannot see their impact, are not learning new skills, or do not feel valued by their employer, they will move on.

 
extend-counter-offer

EMPLOYERS

65% of employers said that they would

extend a counter offer in order to keep

their best employees.

EMPLOYEES

However, 60% of employees said that they would

reject a counter offer from their current employer.

However, 60% of employees said that they would reject a counter offer from their current employer.

(an increase from 55% in 2017)

reject-counter-offer

Case in point: there has been a reduction in the number of employees who are willing to accept a counter offer. What professionals are looking for in an employer (and their careers) is changing, so making a last-ditch effort to entice them to stay with higher compensation will not work. The investment needs to be made before they have one foot out the door, and you have to show you care about their future.

 

 

JOB VS. CAREER:

Employee Mentality Over The Years

expand

OLD MODEL:

Work for the

Work for the company

company

work-for-company
contract
pay-benefits
Employees were in search of pay,
benefits, and stability in exchange
for loyalty to the employer.
expand

NEW MODEL:

Work for career development

Work for career

development

career-development
contract
professional-marketability
Employees today are in search of purpose, personalization, and development to improve
professional marketability.
Employees today are in search of purpose,
personalization, and development to
improve professional marketability.

65%

of working professionals plan to stay with their employer for

5 YEARS

OR LESS

of working professionals plan
to stay with their employer for

5 YEARS

OR LESS

To build strong employee engagement, employers must first accept this new relationship with their staff. Next, they must turn inward and determine how they can create a culture that recognizes and nurtures talent, while helping them achieve purpose and fulfillment in their lives.

To help guide employers on navigating the new employer-employee

relationship, this eBook offers a unique perspective into: 

 

 

To help guide employers on navigating the new employer-employee relationship, this eBook offers a unique perspective into: 

 

 
growing-skills-shortage

How to address

the skills shortage

through strategic hiring

train-staff

How redefining job security

has changed the way

employers train staff and

engage with talent

collaboration-transparency

The importance of creating

a culture of collaboration

and transparency

employee-health

How to embrace wellness in

the workplace and invest in

the health of employees

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